Proper Use of Prescription Drugs (POP-D) is a science education curriculum to prevent adolescent prescription drug abuse by teaching about prescription drugs and how these powerful drugs change brain chemistry. The goal of POP-D is to use standards-based learning to increase adolescent understanding of the risks and effects of prescription drug abuse so they engage in the proper use of prescription drugs and avoid prescription drug abuse.

Teachers

The POP-D Teacher’s Guide includes six lessons with a detailed instructional sequence, PowerPoint slides, and in-class activities.

WHOSE BRAIN IS AWESOME
AND AMAZING? YOURS!

Students review basic brain anatomy, learn strategies to enhance healthy brain activity, and use their creativity to design an imaginary brain.

BRAIN CHEMISTRY – AMAZING
AND CHANGING!

Students learn basic brain functions and the process of neurotransmission. In addition, students will learn about prescription drugs and the risk of abusing prescription drugs.

OPIOID PAINKILLERS, OH MY!

Students learn the difference between prescription drug use and prescription drug abuse.

DEPRESSANTS ARE S-L-O-W

Students learn about depressants and why depressants are categorized as a controlled substance.

STIMULANTS – HIGH SPEED
WITH NO BRAKES

Students learn about stimulants and why stimulants are categorized as a controlled substance.

SUMMING IT ALL UP

Students summarize what they learned in the previous lessons and then develop “refusal statements” to resist prescription drug abuse.

Parents

Parent attitudes toward drugs and monitoring of adolescent actions have a significant impact on adolescent use of drugs. Research shows that adolescents in the 7th – 12th grades that learn about drug risks from parents are up to 50 percent less likely to use drugs, but only 22 percent of parents talk with their children about prescription drug abuse.
Click through the four sections below to help you start the conversation with your kids.
  • Prepare yourself
    and your family
  • openly discuss prescription
    drug abuse
  • Properly secure and dispose
    of prescription drugs
  • Do something if you suspect your
    child is using prescription drugs

Prepare yourself and your family

Learn about prescription drug abuse, how to talk to your child and family, and develop rules and expectations about prescription drugs for your family.

Resources:

Openly discuss prescription drug abuse

Have a discussion with your child and family about prescription drugs and prescription drug abuse. Set clear rules and expectations about prescription drugs.
Why should I talk to my child about prescription drug abuse?

Properly secure and dispose of prescription drugs

Store all prescription drugs in a secure location. Lock painkillers, depressants, and stimulants in a cabinet or lock-box and monitor them carefully. Dispose of all expired or unused prescription drugs. Most drugs can be mixed with coffee grounds or used pet litter, sealed in a container, and thrown in the trash.

Do something if you suspect your child is using prescription drugs

Talk to your child about the changes you see in him or her and how it makes you feel. Avoid accusations, but be persistent. Don’t be afraid to seek expert guidance.
What are the warning signs of prescription drug abuse?

Students

Learn more about prescription drugs from Ace and his friends.

Whose brain is awesome and amazing? Yours!

Brain Chemistry

Opioid Painkillers

Depressants

Stimulants

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on email